Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://www.arca.fiocruz.br/handle/icict/18035
Title: HTLV-1aA introduction into Brazil and its association with the trans-Atlantic slave trade
Authors: Amoussa, Adjile Edjide Roukiyath
Wilkinson, Eduan
Giovanetti, Marta
Rego, Filipe Ferreira de Almeida
Araujo, Thessika Hialla Almeida
Gonçalves, Marilda de Souza
Oliveira, Tulio de
Alcantara, Luiz Carlos Júnior
Affilliation: Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Laboratório de Hematologia, Genética e Biologia Computacional. Salvador, BA, Brasil / Fundação de Hematologia e Hemoterapia da Bahia. Salvador, BA, Brasil
University of Kwazulu-Natal. Africa Centre for Health and Population Studies. Durban, South Africa
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Laboratório de Hematologia, Genética e Biologia Computacional. Salvador, BA, Brasil / University of Rome “Tor Vergata”. Italy
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Laboratório de Hematologia, Genética e Biologia Computacional. Salvador, BA, Brasil / Catholic University of Salvador. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Laboratório de Hematologia, Genética e Biologia Computacional. Salvador, BA, Brasil / Bahia School of Medicine and Public Health. Bahia Foundation for Development of Science. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Laboratório de Hematologia, Genética e Biologia Computacional. Salvador, BA, Brasil
University of Kwazulu-Natal. Africa Centre for Health and Population Studies. Durban, South Africa
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz. Laboratório de Hematologia, Genética e Biologia Computacional. Salvador, BA, Brasil
Abstract: Human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) is an endemic virus in some parts of the world, with Africa being home to most of the viral genetic diversity. In Brazil, HTLV-1 is endemic amongst Japanese and African immigrant populations. Multiple introductions of the virus in Brazil from other epidemic foci were hypothesized. The long terminal repeat (LTR) region of HTLV-1 was used to infer the origin of the virus in Brazil, using phylogenetic analysis. Methods: LTR sequences were obtained from the HTLV-1 database (http://htlv1db.bahia.fiocruz.br). Sequences were aligned and maximum-likelihood and Bayesian tree topologies were inferred. Brazilian specific clusters were identified and molecular-clock and coalescent models were used to estimate each cluster's time to the most recent common ancestor (tMRCA). Results: Three Brazilian clusters were identified with a posterior probability ranged from 0.61 to 0.99. Molecular clock analysis of these three clusters dated back their respective tMRCAs between the year 1499 and the year 1668. Additional analysis also identified a close association between Brazilian sequences and new sequences from South Africa. Conclusion: Our results support the hypothesis of amultiple introductions of HTLV-1 into Brazil,with the majority of introductions occurring in the post-Colombian period. Our results further suggest that HTLV-1 introduction into Brazil was facilitated by the trans-Atlantic slave trade fromendemic areas of Africa. The close association between southern African and Brazilian sequences also suggested that greater numbers of the southern African Bantu population might also have been part of the slave trade than previously though
Keywords: HTLV-1
Brazil
Southern Africa
Trans-Atlantic slave trade
keywords: HTLV-1
Brasil
África do Sul
Escravos
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: AMOUSSA, A. E. R. et al. HTLV-1aA introduction into Brazil and its association with the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Infection, Genetics and Evolution, v. 48, p. 95–101, 2017.
DOI: 10.1016/j.meegid.2016.12.005
ISSN: 1567-1348
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:IGM - Artigos de Periódicos

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